Ben Esposito - RE/MAX Real Estate Center



Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/26/2019

Moving to your new home can either be a fun experience or a very stressful time, depending upon how you choose to manage it. Deliberately preparing yourself for the entire process is one definite way of making sure that the moving experience is a fun one for you. Follow these simple ideas to change your home with ease.

  • Find a moving company: Unless you insist on doing the move yourself, you might be better off with a professional moving company. Ask for good recommendations and decide on one mover that is well within your budget. Schedule a date for the moving with the company when you finally pick one. You can begin this about two months before you have to leave, to give you enough time to wrap up the process.
  • Sort and purge: Decide what you want to move to your new home. Some items will probably be too old or useless where you are going too, so you should sell, give to your neighbors or donate to charity. During this period, you should also work on exhausting things that you won't move, such as perishable food items or cleaning supplies. Ideally, you should start doing this about six weeks before your moving date.
  • Start Packing: At about a month to your moving date, you should start packing your non-essential items into boxes. Things that you don’t use frequently should be the first to go in your boxes. Make sure you mark each carton with a label that identifies what is in the box and what room it's going to in your new home. As your move date draws nearer, pack everything you no longer need until you settle in at your new home at once.
  • Clear out your home: If you have storage facilities outside your current home, like a garage or shed, you should start clearing them out for the move. You want to avoid forgetting something that might turn out to be very important. Wash, dry and pack up all your clothing too. Don't forget to return any items you may have borrowed from neighbors in the past.
  • Final arrangements: In the last days before you leave, go round your house a few times to be sure you are not leaving anything behind. Pack a night bag that you can live out of, pending when you finally settle in at your new home. If using professional movers, ask them for wardrobe boxes to make it easier to unpack your clothes when you arrive. If you need recommendations on moving companies, ask around at the next neighborhood meeting. 

With a plan of action like this, changing your home would not be stressful. Your realtor makes it even less stressful by helping you time closing and moving dates.




Tags: moving tips   family   new home  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/12/2019

A bustling household can wreak havoc on the peace of mind of a natural introvert. Finding a getaway place inside your home to rest and rejuvenate so that you can return to your busy family life refreshed might seem impossible in your home. But carving out a quiet place might be easier than you think.

Make your bath a private retreat

A shared family bathroom might not seem very spa-like, but a few inexpensive additions can get you some private time in a restful atmosphere. If you have an en-suite, it’s even better.

  • You’ll need to prepare in advance, so spend a day cleaning your bathroom and clearing out the cabinets. Remove anything old or unused. Consolidate what remains into items used every day versus items used once-in-awhile. Move the less used items into cabinets or a hall closet to free up counter and tub space.
  • Use inexpensive caddies to hold everyday items. Divide these by family member if possible so that after each person starts or ends their day, all products return to the caddy for storage under the sink.
  • Set a basket beside the tub to hold hair products and body wash. Keeping these items out of the bathtub makes getting into spa-mode easier.
  • Create a basket with your favorite relaxation candles, bath bomb, bath pillow, hair wrap, and fluffy robe. When you need your private time, announce to the family that the bathroom is off limits. Grab a glass of wine, then set out your candle, fill the tub and slip away.

Reading Nook

Sometimes you need personal space to hide in plain sight. Create a reading nook for yourself in whatever alcove you can find. This nook might be an awkward corner of the living room or family room—you know, that place no one likes to sit because it doesn't have a clear view of the TV. Move a chair into that space and deliberately turn it away from the television. Add a side table and lamp. You've got your space, and you can ignore the rest of the world while you lose yourself in a book.

Unused dining room

Modern families often don't find time to use the formal dining room. This designated area often falls prey to renovations and open concept floor plans. If your home still has one, however, and even if you still use it, you can turn it into your private oasis. 

  • Extend the chandelier on a longer chain so that you can “move” the center of the room. Push the table toward one side and even consider using a bench along the back. This setup will give you more space to carve out your private space.
  • Place a chaise near a window or add a cushion to a deep windowsill to create a seating area just for you.

Since your family only uses the area occasionally, you’ll have it to yourself most of the time.

If your home truly doesn't lend itself to carving out that quiet place, talk to your real estate professional about your special needs and start scoping out a better layout.




Tags: family   bathroom   privacy   space  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Ben Esposito on 1/7/2018

Moving to a new home is difficult for everyone. Children, pets, not even you are immune to the stresses of adjusting to a new life. But moving can also be a great experience. They can help a family grow closer together, discover new interests and hobbies, and create new memories together.

In this article, we’re going to give you some moving tips that will help you and your family make the most of your decision to relocate, and maybe give you a new optimism to endure the stressful process of moving.

Making a move easier on your pets

When our pets are sick or upset it can be heartbreaking for us. We can’t use our words to explain that everything will be okay. Generally, pets are resilient and can often adapt easily to a new environment. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to help make it easier for them.

To introduce your pet to their new home, take them for a visit before the move, if possible. Let them sniff around for a while and get comfortable with the place, assuring them that there is no danger there.

On moving day, have your pet stay with a relative or pet-sitter for the day so they don’t get lost or trampled on during the hectic moving process.

Once you’re all moved in, let your pet explore the new home freely, making sure their toys, bedding, or litter box are all within their reach.

Helping kids cope with a move

A move can be particularly stressful for children. Oftentimes moving homes means changing schools, leaving old friends and making new ones.

Before you even begin looking at homes, try to get your child involved in the process so they don’t feel powerless. Encourage them by showing them fun things to do in their new town, like nice parks or their favorite stores. Get them involved in planning out their new room, like how it will be painted and decorated.

In terms of school, try to time your move so that your child can make some friends before the school year begins. Plus, explain to them how easy it is to stay in touch with old friends through email, Facebook, or whatever method is appropriate for their age. Find out if there are children in your new neighborhood, or a club or sport that your child can join to help them make new friends.

Don’t neglect your own anxiety

While it’s important to help our family deal with the new move, it’s also vital to take care of our own needs. Make sure you spend time on your own interests and try to avoid isolating yourself from others during this stressful time.

If you’re starting a new job, take note of whether or not you’re bringing that stress home with you and try to set aside time for yourself to do the things you like to help you unwind. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, be sure to reach out to your spouse, a friend, and/or a counselor.

If you and your family take the time to help each other, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a fun move and enjoy your new home together.







Tags: moving tips   pets   family   moving   children  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Ben Esposito on 7/30/2017

Getting a new dog is every child's dream. But dogs aren't just great for the kids, they can be a great companion for an individual or a couple in their new home, or as a way to cope with empty nest syndrome when the kids leave. Whether you buy a puppy or adopt a dog in need of a good home, you'll need to do a lot of training. One of the first mistakes dog owners make is to think that training is something you only need to do until your dog learns the rules. However, training is an ongoing process that will help build your relationship with your dog and keep you both happy. If you're thinking about bringing home a new dog, follow these home training tips to make sure your dog understands the rules of the house and can stay out of trouble.

Have a house meeting

Before bringing your new dog home you're going to want everyone in your home to be on the same page about rules for the dog. Dogs are very intelligent and malleable creatures, but they will learn best and be less confused if everyone is teaching them the same behavior. That means if there's a "no dogs on the couch" rule, everyone needs to enforce it. Similarly, the commands you use for your dog should all be the same within the house. If one member of the family calls the dog by saying "come" and another says "here, boy" they will probably eventually get the idea, but the best approach is for everyone to use the same words, especially when the dog is first learning.

Setting some rules

So you have your new dog... congratulations! Now comes the hard part: not babying them and letting them have their way all the time. You need to teach your dog to respect you and your home. That does not mean your dog should fear you. In fact, having a dog that is afraid of you can lead to many problems including disobedience and aggression towards you and other people. To build trust and respect with your dog it will talk a lot of work (and treats) on your part. Here are some important training tips for training a dog in your home. FOOD As a dog's most important resource, food and water routines are central to training your dog. Dogs are creatures of habit and should be fed at the same time every day. To build good habits, make your dog sit while to give them their food and ten call them over to eat. This will teach them that you are in control and that you can be trusted with their food source. When it comes to table food, avoid getting in the habit of letting your dog eat food that was on your plate. It may seem like a waste, but it is in the best interest of you and your dog to stick to just dog food for the pup. FURNITURE  You may be tempted to let your dog jump up on the couch or bed with you, but by doing so you're giving them permission to show dominance. Get a comfy dog bed or crate for your dog where they will feel at home. This will teach them that you're the boss and help save your furniture from messes. BED TIME It's tempting to let your dog hop up on your bed with you at night to sleep like a cat might. But in doing so, you might be setting yourself up for having a dog who is overprotective of you and pushy when it comes to where he can be. Your dog's crate or dog bed are both safer places for him to be and will help lessen separation anxiety overnight.  




Tags: home   pets   dogs   family   dog   house   house training   rules  
Categories: Uncategorized