Ben Esposito - RE/MAX Real Estate Center



Posted by Ben Esposito on 4/8/2018

Once you have signed the purchase and sales agreement, the property will be appraised by a licensed appraiser. The home appraisal is an estimate of what the property is valued at. The appraisal takes into account a number of factors such as the location of the home, the condition of the house, and recent sales of like homes in the area. The value that is determined by the appraiser is the maximum amount that can be loaned out by a mortgage company.   


If youíre buying a $300,000 home, but the appraisal comes back at $297,000, youíll need to pay the remaining $3,000 out of pocket in addition to the down payment and the closing costs that are paid up front at the time of purchase.


If the appraisal comes in too low, you might not have the necessary funds in your bank account to actually make the purchase of the home. Since you have already signed the purchase and sales agreement, you have signed a legally binding contract that states that you will in fact buy the home from the seller. If you break the agreement, youíll lose your deposit, which could be a significant sum of money.  



The Appraisal Contingency


Most purchase agreements contain something called an appraisal contingency. This is an out for the buyer in the case of a low appraisal. If the appraisal is less than the agreed upon price, thereís a way for you as a buyer to get out of the contract without it taking a hit on your finances. You need this contingency to protect you.  


Is Waiving The Appraisal Contingency Is A Good Idea? 


You could be in a situation where you might consider waiving the appraisal contingency. This would be a case where you agree to pay the entire amount of the contact price, even in the event of a low appraisal. This gives the seller a clear message that you want the home no matter what. The only way that you should even really consider doing this is if there is a lot of competition for the home that you want to purchase. If an appraisal comes back much lower than expected, youíll be expected to make up the difference in price. In most cases, itís a good idea to keep the appraisal contingency in the agreement to protect yourself as a buyer.


How To Know For Sure


This is why itís so important to hire a real estate agent. In many states, agents are able to give you advice on the best course of action for buying a home. You can also hire your own attorney to help you through the legal portions of the home buying process. In other states, attorneys are required for the sale of a home. These lawyers will be able to advise you as a buyer whatís in your best interest. Your attorney is there to protect you!





Posted by Ben Esposito on 10/22/2017

Ready to negotiate the purchase of a new home? Ultimately, employing a real estate agent may help you avoid the stress and anxiety that is commonly associated with a homebuying negotiation.

There are many reasons to hire a real estate agent to handle a homebuying negotiation, including:

1. A real estate agent understands the art of negotiation.

A negotiation is a high-pressure situation, one that may be difficult to navigate on your own. Fortunately, a real estate agent understands what it takes to help a homebuyer get the best price for a house Ė without exception.

With a real estate agent at your side, you can receive support from an experienced negotiator.

A real estate agent possesses extensive skills and know-how, particularly when it comes to homebuying negotiations. This housing market expert will be able to negotiate with a home seller and ensure all parties are satisfied with the end results.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will dedicate the necessary time and resources to complete a successful homebuying negotiation. He or she will go the extra mile to negotiate with a home seller to help you acquire a home that matches or exceeds your expectations.

2. A real estate agent will keep you up to date at all times.

If you employ a real estate agent, it is important to know that this housing market professional will keep you informed throughout a homebuying negotiation. Lucky for you, a real estate agent will provide updates as you try to acquire your dream residence at a price that matches your budget.

A real estate agent acts as a liaison between you and a home seller. He or she will keep you up to date at each stage of a homebuying negotiation and will require your approval on any homebuying decisions.

Also, a real estate agent will provide suggestions during a homebuying negotiation. As a homebuyer, you always have the option to accept or reject this housing market professional's suggestions.

3. A real estate agent is unafraid to be honest with you.

Although a real estate agent will do everything possible to help you streamline a homebuying negotiation, he or she will provide honest, unbiased recommendations as well.

For example, if you want a home seller to drastically lower the price of a home after a property inspection, a real estate agent will handle your request. And if a home seller rejects your proposal, this housing market professional will provide you with feedback and help you map out your next step accordingly.

A real estate agent will be able to respond to any concerns or questions that you have during a homebuying negotiation too. As such, he or she can provide a valuable resource and offer homebuying insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

Don't let the complexities of a homebuying negotiation overwhelm you. Instead, collaborate with a real estate agent, and you can speed up the process of purchasing your ideal residence.





Posted by Ben Esposito on 10/15/2017


Whether you're 25 or 65, one thing's for sure: Home ownership, raising a family, and having enough money to retire comfortably takes a lot of money! Surprisingly, a high percentage of people of all ages have not accumulated a sufficient nest egg for their future needs.

What many homeowners (and aspiring homeowners) don't stop to realize is that there are many opportunities to save money, reduce expenses, and keep more of your hard-earned cash where it belongs: in your pocket, bank account, or retirement plan. While it may seem like your money flies out the window as fast as you can earn it, you may be overlooking some key strategies for holding on to more of it. One of the most powerful tactics for saving and making more money is learning how to negotiate effectively.

Practicing the Art of Negotiation

Virtually "everything is negotiable," especially in real estate transactions. Fortunately, you can rely on a good real estate agent to look out for your interests and get you the best deal. However, it is generally to your advantage to have a basic understanding of negotiating principles and the possibility of winning concessions from the other side.

Perhaps the number one thing to keep in mind when attending an open house or touring a home you're considering buying is to choose your words carefully -- particularly if you're in the presence of the seller's agent or the home seller, themselves (Note: If you're just viewing the house with your buyers' agent, you don't have to worry about weighing your words or being too effusive.) As an example, if you blurt out "This house is absolutely perfect!" or "This is exactly what we're looking for!" then you're putting yourself at a strategic disadvantage when it comes to making an offer on the house. It pays to "play things close to the vest." That expression, of course, originated from the game of poker, in which it's a tactical error to let your opponents see your cards.

There are dozens of situations in life where negotiating skills can help you gain hundreds, if not thousands of additional dollars from a transaction. Examples range from negotiating a raise or a starting salary to buying or selling real estate or automobiles. By developing your negotiating skills and practicing them at every opportunity, you'll find yourself gaining financial and other advantages that wouldn't otherwise be available to you. As the poem "My Wage" by Jessie B. Rittenhouse reminds us, if we bargain with life for pennies, then that's exactly what we'll get in return.

By negotiating the best possible deal in real estate transactions, automobile purchases, home improvement contracts, employment opportunities, credit card interest rates, and dozens of other situations, you can build up a larger retirement nest egg, help your kids pay for college, and achieve a greater measure of financial security.