Ben Esposito - RE/MAX Real Estate Center



Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/26/2019

Moving to your new home can either be a fun experience or a very stressful time, depending upon how you choose to manage it. Deliberately preparing yourself for the entire process is one definite way of making sure that the moving experience is a fun one for you. Follow these simple ideas to change your home with ease.

  • Find a moving company: Unless you insist on doing the move yourself, you might be better off with a professional moving company. Ask for good recommendations and decide on one mover that is well within your budget. Schedule a date for the moving with the company when you finally pick one. You can begin this about two months before you have to leave, to give you enough time to wrap up the process.
  • Sort and purge: Decide what you want to move to your new home. Some items will probably be too old or useless where you are going too, so you should sell, give to your neighbors or donate to charity. During this period, you should also work on exhausting things that you won't move, such as perishable food items or cleaning supplies. Ideally, you should start doing this about six weeks before your moving date.
  • Start Packing: At about a month to your moving date, you should start packing your non-essential items into boxes. Things that you don’t use frequently should be the first to go in your boxes. Make sure you mark each carton with a label that identifies what is in the box and what room it's going to in your new home. As your move date draws nearer, pack everything you no longer need until you settle in at your new home at once.
  • Clear out your home: If you have storage facilities outside your current home, like a garage or shed, you should start clearing them out for the move. You want to avoid forgetting something that might turn out to be very important. Wash, dry and pack up all your clothing too. Don't forget to return any items you may have borrowed from neighbors in the past.
  • Final arrangements: In the last days before you leave, go round your house a few times to be sure you are not leaving anything behind. Pack a night bag that you can live out of, pending when you finally settle in at your new home. If using professional movers, ask them for wardrobe boxes to make it easier to unpack your clothes when you arrive. If you need recommendations on moving companies, ask around at the next neighborhood meeting. 

With a plan of action like this, changing your home would not be stressful. Your realtor makes it even less stressful by helping you time closing and moving dates.




Tags: moving tips   family   new home  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/19/2019

The kitchen is one of the busiest rooms in a home. Not just a place to cook meals it’s also often the entrance to a home and where families gather together at the end of the day. Arguably, it’s also the most important room in the home and the one home buyers should be most astute of.

The kitchen is one of the most expensive rooms to remodel ranging between $20,000 and $50,000. Whether you’re eager for some renovation projects or looking for a move-in ready home, you’ll want to assess the level of work this room will need as your shop potential houses.

Start with perhaps the most obvious - is the room large enough for your daily needs? Is there plenty of counter space or room to expand cabinetry? Do you have a lot of kitchen tools that call for plenty of storage space or perhaps prefer an island to prep dinner at? Know what your ideal kitchen space ahead of time, especially if it is a priority, so your realtor can help you find the perfect fit.

Check that all appliances to ensure they are in working order as per the disclosure statement claims. Appliances are a big expense and you’ll want to have a good idea of what will need replacing or to be installed. Consider if they are an easy color to match when it comes time for replacement and if any are under warranty.

You’ll also want to examine the cabinetry. Check to ensure all drawers and cabinets are properly aligned and open smoothly. If they are wooden cabinets you can easily swap out hardware or change the color if you’re not a fan of the current style. However, other materials are not as convenient so consider replacement costs if you’re unhappy with the current installation.

Countertops can be another major expense. Have the granite countertops been properly taken care of? If they are laminate are they scratched or chipped? If this isn’t an upgrade you’re looking to make, be sure to look closely at what each home already has in place.

Kitchens are one of the busiest rooms in your home, especially if you love to cook. Check flooring for loose tiles, discoloration or poorly maintained wood flooring. This tells you a few things. Firstly, the quality of the materials used to build the home. And secondly, how well the house has been maintained over time.

Remodeling isn’t on everyone's list when house shopping. And with kitchen’s being one of the most expensive to renovate, this is one room you want to pay extra attention to as you view each potential home. Happy house hunting!




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Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/12/2019

A bustling household can wreak havoc on the peace of mind of a natural introvert. Finding a getaway place inside your home to rest and rejuvenate so that you can return to your busy family life refreshed might seem impossible in your home. But carving out a quiet place might be easier than you think.

Make your bath a private retreat

A shared family bathroom might not seem very spa-like, but a few inexpensive additions can get you some private time in a restful atmosphere. If you have an en-suite, it’s even better.

  • You’ll need to prepare in advance, so spend a day cleaning your bathroom and clearing out the cabinets. Remove anything old or unused. Consolidate what remains into items used every day versus items used once-in-awhile. Move the less used items into cabinets or a hall closet to free up counter and tub space.
  • Use inexpensive caddies to hold everyday items. Divide these by family member if possible so that after each person starts or ends their day, all products return to the caddy for storage under the sink.
  • Set a basket beside the tub to hold hair products and body wash. Keeping these items out of the bathtub makes getting into spa-mode easier.
  • Create a basket with your favorite relaxation candles, bath bomb, bath pillow, hair wrap, and fluffy robe. When you need your private time, announce to the family that the bathroom is off limits. Grab a glass of wine, then set out your candle, fill the tub and slip away.

Reading Nook

Sometimes you need personal space to hide in plain sight. Create a reading nook for yourself in whatever alcove you can find. This nook might be an awkward corner of the living room or family room—you know, that place no one likes to sit because it doesn't have a clear view of the TV. Move a chair into that space and deliberately turn it away from the television. Add a side table and lamp. You've got your space, and you can ignore the rest of the world while you lose yourself in a book.

Unused dining room

Modern families often don't find time to use the formal dining room. This designated area often falls prey to renovations and open concept floor plans. If your home still has one, however, and even if you still use it, you can turn it into your private oasis. 

  • Extend the chandelier on a longer chain so that you can “move” the center of the room. Push the table toward one side and even consider using a bench along the back. This setup will give you more space to carve out your private space.
  • Place a chaise near a window or add a cushion to a deep windowsill to create a seating area just for you.

Since your family only uses the area occasionally, you’ll have it to yourself most of the time.

If your home truly doesn't lend itself to carving out that quiet place, talk to your real estate professional about your special needs and start scoping out a better layout.




Tags: family   bathroom   privacy   space  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Ben Esposito on 5/5/2019

Everyone wants to own a home of their own at some point in their lives. There is only one first home, and you don't get a second chance. Well, you get a second or third if you want, but that first experience can have a significant effect on how you feel about homeownership. So, here a just a few common sense tips. Unfortunately, common sense isn't always common.

First, slow down. There is no rush to buy that home. When you hurry, you put pressure on yourself to get it done, and you overlook things that can cost you time and money down the line. Sometimes family puts pressure on you to buy your first home so that you can start having babies and they don't want their babies living in a little apartment. Again remember, you are the one who has to live there and the one that has to pay for it. So all those people putting pressure to buy really should not have that kind of influence unless they commit to the full responsibility of the homeownership.

Second, be realistic about the cost. You commonly hear that it is cheaper to own than to rent, and depending on the point of view that can be true. Most people are saying that based on just principle and interest. But have you ever driven through a nice neighborhood and some houses are really kept looking nice, and then there are those houses that the yard is a mess? The grass is not green, flowers and maybe even trees are dying — the actual physical house kind of looks a little run down. You think "this is your home, why are you not taking care of it?" Well, there is a thing that as renters you never have to deal with, and it is called upkeep. Also, utilities like water can get expensive.In a lot of cases, the homeowners bought as much as they could afford in payments without having anything extra. So now they do not have the money for the excess water to water the grass or buy new plants or clean the shutters or fix a window. Take time to understand what your budget is currently. Could you right now—outside of your rent—put an extra twenty to thirty percent of your income into a savings account and have it not affect your food budget? If you can START. RIGHT. NOW. Remember you do have to have a down payment too, so if you don't have it in hand, you have to start saving for it.

Third, look at homes. Do not engage a realtor yet! They have one job, and it is to sell you a house. Right now you are not to that point, so do not put that pressure on yourself. Start driving around neighborhoods and start observing different things about them. Start getting into the habit of seeing the little details of each home. Go online Friday night and find the OPEN HOUSES that are going to take place on Saturday and Sunday. Determine which ones you would like to see. Look at ones that are way out of your price range, ones in your price range, and then do not miss the ones that are way below your price range. Remember it is better to be way below your budget than at the very top end. As you go through each of these homes, do not just wander through. Take your time to look at the details. Not only the cool aspects but the little things that show that might be wrong, a link in a sink, marks in the walls and doors. These opens houses not only help you figure out what you do or do not want, but they also help you not to miss things when you are ready to buy and find the house that you would like to purchase. There is nothing worse than buying a home and after you moved in you start seeing things that are an issue that you do not remember being there before you purchased.

It is all about the details and since you have never purchased a home before you need practice paying attention to the details so you will be the best buyer you can be when you have your downpayment ready.

One last note, when you visit these open houses, the realtor usually wants a contact number for follow-up. If you are not ready for that pressure, let them know you're just in the preliminary stages of looking. A home could be the biggest purchase of your life, so go into it relaxed and prepared.




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Posted by Ben Esposito on 4/28/2019

Relocating to a new city, and moving into a new home you bought at the same time, can be a complicated process. From hiring a real estate agent and buying a new house, to planning your move, the to-do list is growing. To make that move a smooth and successful one you need a guide and some helpful tips.

Here are the tips you need to stay afloat and make sure your move is a success.

1. Check your financial muscle 

In any situation, your finance is the power, and your budget is the overall determinant of your level of expenses. To succeed in your quest to relocate and purchase a house, you must know what you can afford, and then you make your budget. 

Start by checking how much money you need to buy a house first in a new city and the amount that will take care of your relocation expenses. Then, you find out the cost of packing supplies and moving services. A full service moving company offers their services at a premium if you are moving from one state to another.

You need to check your savings and monthly income to know how much you can spend buying a new home. Apart from paying your monthly mortgage fees and down payment, other costs you must offset are homeowner’s insurance, realtor’s fee, utilities, property tax, and closing costs.

2. Try out renting first

If you are relocating to a city you’re entirely unfamiliar with, try renting a place in that area first. When you rent a house, you will have the opportunity to try out the new neighborhood to know if it is what you want. If you have tested it and are satisfied with the area, then proceed to buy a home there. When you’re ready, you can accomplish with the help of a realtor.

3. Pay the city a visit

Although you can learn a lot about the town online, a physical visit and on-the-spot assessment of the new city is crucial. Those assessments will help you get to know the various neighborhoods in that area and give you the opportunity to meet with the realtor.

4. Check the city’s transportation options, the commute, and the general safety

Make sure you research the city’s transportation options from buses, taxis, to subways and ensure they are what you need. Living very close to your place of work has many benefits, but if you prefer long commutes, there is no problem. Safety is the number one factor influencing your relocation to a new place; you wouldn’t want to live in a crime-ridden area. 

5. Hire a trusted realtor

Look for a realtor that fits your needs. Your realtor should have a thorough knowledge of the various housing markets in different neighborhoods and should be able to guide you to buy your new home. It is better to meet a reputable real estate agent before you move. 

Ready to Move?

Relocating to a new house should not be a difficult task if you prepare yourself and engage the services of trusted moving service to help. Are you ready to move? Check out long distance movers in both your new city and your current one.




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